Furling mainsail replacement


Tom Weaver
 

I am about to replace my sails and have received a couple quotes.   My question is concerning the weight of the material for the in-mast furling main.   The two quotes I have so far are for 9.0 ounce and 8.8 ounce sail fabric.   Wondering if anyone else has replaced their furling main and what the weight of the fabric was.  If the fabric is too thick, it might not furl all the way in.  

Thanks for any help.  


Alan Johnson
 

I replaced mine with 9 oz.  on hull #130 a 1998 with a z spar mast.  Works fine.  If I were to do it again I would have specified vertical battens.

Alan J

On Thu, Jan 14, 2021 at 8:39 PM Tom Weaver <tom.weaver@...> wrote:
I am about to replace my sails and have received a couple quotes.   My question is concerning the weight of the material for the in-mast furling main.   The two quotes I have so far are for 9.0 ounce and 8.8 ounce sail fabric.   Wondering if anyone else has replaced their furling main and what the weight of the fabric was.  If the fabric is too thick, it might not furl all the way in.  

Thanks for any help.  


Tom Sokoloski
 

Tom,
I agree with Alan. When I had a new mail made (about 8-9 yrs ago?), the sailmaker talked me out of vertical battens. After one season, I went to another sailmaker and had them installed. Best thing I ever did for the sail. Much better shape, doesn't flutter, and doesn't get jammed. Four battens, each about 4' long. They don't even come close to overlapping. Hope this helps.

Tom Soko
Juniper #307
Noank, CT

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Tom Soko
Juniper #307
Noank, CT


Ken
 

Tom,

In my opinion, the weight and type of the sailcloth should be driven by the type of sailing you do.  If you expect to be sailing in 25+ kts a lot go with the heavier cloth.  If you sail in mostly <20 kts, then the lighter cloth will benefit you with a better set in light air.  The distinct advantage of in mast furling (I'm assuming that's what you have) is the ability to reef very easily without being tied to distinct reef points.  Because of this I would lean toward lighter cloth.

But the type of cloth used is far more important than the weight but that's a different discussion.  

It takes a very good sailmaker to design a proper hollow roach mainsail that won't flutter, it's more of an art that has been lost.  A sailmaker that has made his/her reputation in making good setting #1 genoas in dacron can often due justice to an in mast mainsail.  If you don't have a well designed hollow roach the sail will flutter.

The benefits of treating a new furling mainsail with SailCote are real.

What ever sail you have built insist on a real metal cam cleat and spectra line for the leech line.  And ask for the leech line to be extra long so you can actually use it on a beam to broad reach.  I put an eye loop on the end of the leech line and can reach it and adjust on any point of sail except downwind with a boathook.

Also on a sail that tends to leech flutter, it's good insurance to specify double leech tablings.

These are just my opinions and YMMV.


Matt Perry
 

Ken I have a C400 but am currently on an IP 485 headed to Antiqua with a brand new inmast furling main. We have sever leech flutter. Not familiar with the term double leech tabling? We have adjusted leech line. 

On Fri, Jan 15, 2021 at 2:30 PM Ken <kdg_1@...> wrote:
Tom,

In my opinion, the weight and type of the sailcloth should be driven by the type of sailing you do.  If you expect to be sailing in 25+ kts a lot go with the heavier cloth.  If you sail in mostly <20 kts, then the lighter cloth will benefit you with a better set in light air.  The distinct advantage of in mast furling (I'm assuming that's what you have) is the ability to reef very easily without being tied to distinct reef points.  Because of this I would lean toward lighter cloth.

But the type of cloth used is far more important than the weight but that's a different discussion.  

It takes a very good sailmaker to design a proper hollow roach mainsail that won't flutter, it's more of an art that has been lost.  A sailmaker that has made his/her reputation in making good setting #1 genoas in dacron can often due justice to an in mast mainsail.  If you don't have a well designed hollow roach the sail will flutter.

The benefits of treating a new furling mainsail with SailCote are real.

What ever sail you have built insist on a real metal cam cleat and spectra line for the leech line.  And ask for the leech line to be extra long so you can actually use it on a beam to broad reach.  I put an eye loop on the end of the leech line and can reach it and adjust on any point of sail except downwind with a boathook.

Also on a sail that tends to leech flutter, it's good insurance to specify double leech tablings.

These are just my opinions and YMMV.

--
Matt Perry


Ken
 

Tabling is the folded and hemmed sailcloth that is used to cover the unfinished ends of the sailcloth at the leech, foot and luff.  


Matt Perry
 

Got it. Thanks. 

On Sun, Jan 17, 2021 at 6:49 AM Ken <kdg_1@...> wrote:
Tabling is the folded and hemmed sailcloth that is used to cover the unfinished ends of the sailcloth at the leech, foot and luff.  

--
Matt Perry